Distributive policy

A policy reversal on power privatization in Pondicherry is unlikely as the decision rests with the Union Home Ministry

In a meeting with Lt. Governor Tamilisai Soundararajan and other officials, Puducherry CM N. Rangasamy had suggested postponing the privatization move at least until after Pongal to give confidence to all stakeholders, government sources said.

In a meeting with Lt. Governor Tamilisai Soundararajan and other officials, Puducherry CM N. Rangasamy had suggested postponing the privatization move at least until after Pongal to give confidence to all stakeholders, government sources said.

The reversal of the policy of privatization of the electricity distribution system in the Union Territory is unlikely, especially after the meeting that Chief Minister N. Rangasamy had with Lieutenant Governor Tamilisai Soundararajan at Raj Nivas on September 30, Cabinet sources said.

During the meeting, which was held for about 30 minutes in the presence of Chief Secretary Rajiv Verma, Secretary Power T. Arun and Lieutenant Governor’s Secretary Abhijit Vijay Chaudhary, the Chief Minister had suggested postponing the move of privatization at least after Pongal. to give all stakeholders confidence, government sources said.

“The Chief Minister has suggested suspending the decision until the end of the festival season as employees have gone on an indefinite strike. The monsoon is imminent and if the standoff with the employees continues, it will be difficult to meet any demands. In addition, power cuts during the festival period will be an obstacle for the public as well as for commercial establishments. So the chief minister made the request,” said a cabinet member. The Hindu.

According to reports, the Cabinet source said the Home Office was unlikely to reverse a political decision. “It is a political decision of the Center and it is unlikely that there will be a reversal. It’s been pending for several years,” he said.

On the public perception that the government has been silent on the Centre’s privatization, a minister said it would be difficult to overcome public interpretation. “But for the government, there are limits to overriding a policy decision that MHA is a UT,” he said.

“We will continue to discuss with the employees and try to put them in confidence. We are also working on ways to financially support households to switch to solar energy under the Smart City program,” he added.

We learn that following the call for tenders for the privatization launched on September 27, the secretary, Power, held talks with representatives of the striking employees on September 28 and 29. The secretary during the talks gave assurances to protect their existing terms of service when migrating to the private entity.

“We stand ready to provide further clarification, if needed, on service issues. But we cannot allow the strike to continue and cause public unrest. The government will also not allow employees to engage in sabotage with the aim of disrupting supply. There are sufficient administrative mechanisms to deal with the strike in departments providing essential services. We have already consulted the legal department on this,” said another minister.