Constituent policy

Kathy Hochul Says Zeldin Has “Soundbites” But Has “Good Politics”

Kathy Hochul Says Zeldin Has “Soundbites” But Has “Good Politics”

  • New York Governor Kathy Hochul spoke to local leaders at an Upper East Side subway station during her first official campaign event on Election Day.
  • Fighting crime was ultimately not a campaign topic for her because she has done so before as governor, she said.
  • New York Governor-elect Kathy Hochul made an appearance at the New York City Metro-North station.

New York Governor Kathy Hochul spoke to local leaders at an Upper East Side subway station during her first official campaign event on Election Day. She tackled one of the most controversial issues: crime.

According to Hochul, fighting crime – a key part of Zeldin’s opposition campaign – is ultimately not a campaign issue for her as she has done so before as governor.

“The difference is in the sound bites compared to a really sound policy.

It’s very easy to stand on a street corner and cry foul, but when you oppose all the sensible gun safety laws that we’ve proposed here in the state, but also when you had the chance to stand up in Congress for the first significant bipartisan gun safety legislation — other Republicans voted for it — he couldn’t even do that.

He didn’t bother to run for Congress to vote to defund the police — so the case is clear,” she said.

“We are working on it; he talks about it,” Hochul added.

“If they think Lee Zeldin is going to stand up for democracy when he had the opportunity to stand up and call out the insurgents, what did he do that day?

He went to blame the Democrats and voted against certifying Joe Biden as our president. That’s how you subvert democracy. This is Exhibit A of the subversion of democracy,” Hochul said.

Hochul also said she and New York City Mayor Eric Adams are “partners” in fighting crime.

“It’s not an election issue for me. We said we were going to partner, for the first time, the governor of New York will really commit to helping the mayor of the city. This relationship has only done get stronger; you can ask Mayor Adams himself,” she said.

At the 86th Street station, Hochul made an appearance alongside Representatives Carolyn Maloney, Jerry Nadler, Liz Krueger, Rebecca Seawright and Mark Levine, the Manhattan Borough President.

When asked if there was something New Yorkers might not know about her, she said maybe it was “how tough I am.”

“I consider myself a Buffalo street fighter. I had to overcome a lot of hardships, as many women do. You have to break down a lot of barriers, but that makes you stronger, makes you harder to overcome challenges,” Hochul said.

“There’s nothing I can’t handle,” she continued, adding that the election had “uplifted” her strength and her desire to serve New York.

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